mardi 24 janvier 2017

ETUDE RECHERCHE Suicide Sleep Monitoring (SSleeM) une étude de faisabilité et d'acceptabilité d'un dispositif ambulatoire de surveillance du sommeil dans les tentatives de suicide

Suicide Sleep Monitoring (SSleeM) une étude de faisabilité et d'acceptabilité d'un dispositif ambulatoire de surveillance du sommeil dans les tentatives de suicide

Titre original : Suicide Sleep Monitoring (SSleeM): a feasibility and acceptability study of a wearable sleep tracking monitoring device in suicide attempters

Elise Guillodo 1 Sofian Berrouiguet 2, 3, 1 Mathieu Simonnet 4, 3 Ismael Conejero 5 Philippe Courtet 5 Enrique Baca-Garcia 6 Romain Billot 2, 3 Philippe Lenca 2, 3 Michel Walter 1
1 Hopital de Bohars (CHRU Brest (Centre Hospitalier Régional et Universitaire de Brest))
2 Lab-STICC_TB_CID_DECIDE Lab-STICC - Laboratoire des sciences et techniques de l'information, de la communication et de la connaissance
3 LUSSI - Département Logique des Usages, Sciences sociales et Sciences de l'Information
4 Lab-STICC_TB_CID_IHSEV Lab-STICC - Laboratoire des sciences et techniques de l'information, de la communication et de la connaissance
5 Pathologies du système nerveux : recherche épidémiologique et clinique
6 Department of Psychiatry (Hospital Universitario Fundacion Jimenez Diaz )
Résumé : Madrid Introduction Sleep disturbances are associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior. The evidence primarily stems from studies based on questionnaires about sleep quality and duration. In recent years, the availability of wearable health technology has increased and offers an inexpensive, appealing, and accessible way to measure sleep. Our aim is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of wearable sleep tracking monitoring devices in a sample of suicide attempters and healthy controls. Methods A prospective, open-label, 12-months study will be conducted in the emergency department (ED) and psychiatric unit (PU) of the University Hospital of Brest, France. Inclusion criteria are male or female, aged 18 or over, surviving a suicide attempt, discharged from ED or PU, with an Internet connection via Wi-Fi, and giving consent. The sleep tracker and a smartphone will be given to the patient after discharge. He or she will receive brief training on how to use the sleep tracker. Patient will be asked to monitor their sleep during the two weeks following the discharge. The feasibility will be explored by analysing the data proceeding from the sleep tracker. The acceptability will be assessed during the two-weeks follow up visit, using a standardized questionnaire. We also will perform a similar assessment in a group of 10 healthy controls recruited via announcement in social networks. Results : Preliminary results of this ongoing study show that feasibility and acceptance may be related to technical features of wearable devices. Discussion A better understanding of the bidirectional mechanism between sleep disturbances and suicide behavior will allow the design of tailored interventions to prevent suicide attempts. 
 

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